Month: November 2016

Call for Evidence: submit your findings on wellbeing and work transitions

What is the relationship between wellbeing and transitions into – and out of – work? Are workers with lower wellbeing more likely to become unemployed, or move into long-term sick-leave, care or early retirement? Similarly, if you have higher levels of wellbeing, are you more likely to move from worklessness into employment? By worklessness, we mean not being in regular employment or education/training, because of unemployment, retirement, disability and, family care. How can you get involved? The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is carrying out a systematic review to find out how wellbeing affects the probability of transitioning into and out of work for different demographic groups. Although life satisfaction is our preferred measure for wellbeing, evidence of effects of wellbeing that may include stress, mental health, anxiety, and depression are also welcomed. Do you know of any work which has explored this? We are particularly seeking the following types of evidence: 1) Evaluations of how individuals’ wellbeing affects transitions into and out of work, duration of worklessness and the subsequent transitions. 2) Evaluation of the impact of poor wellbeing on the probability of remaining in worklessness. 3) Evaluation of the impact of improvements in wellbeing on the likelihood of returning to work. 4) Evaluation of the extent to which the effect of poor wellbeing on worklessness, duration of worklessness and the transitions out of worklessness states vary across...

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Call for Evidence: wellbeing and work transitions

DEADLINE EXTENSION: 21 December 2016 What is the relationship between wellbeing and transitions into – and out of – work? Are workers with lower wellbeing more likely to become unemployed, or move into long-term sick-leave, care or early retirement? Similarly, if you have higher levels of wellbeing, are you more likely to move from worklessness into employment? By worklessness, we mean not being in regular employment or education/training, because of unemployment, retirement, disability and, family care. How can you get involved? The What Works Centre for Wellbeing is carrying out a systematic review to find out how wellbeing affects the probability of transitioning into and out of work for different demographic groups. Although life satisfaction is our preferred measure for wellbeing, evidence of effects of wellbeing that may include stress, mental health, anxiety, and depression are also welcomed. Do you know of any work which has explored this? We are particularly seeking the following evaluations: How individuals’ wellbeing affects transitions into and out of work, duration of worklessness and the subsequent transitions. The impact of poor wellbeing on the probability of remaining in worklessness. The impact of improvements in wellbeing on the likelihood of returning to work. The extent to which the effect of poor wellbeing on worklessness, duration of worklessness and the transitions out of worklessness states vary across groups (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, family status). We welcome...

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The Power of Songs: An Evaluation of Plymouth Music Zone’s ‘Keep Singing, Keepsake’ Project

As part of our new evidence review of music, singing and wellbeing, this case study shows a useful example of evidence in action, highlighting both the successes and challenges faced with a participatory music programme aimed at older people. It is based on a report by Jocey Quinn,  Claudia Blandon, Plymouth University and Plymouth Music Zone, 2014.  The Project The ‘Keep Singing, Keepsake Project’ (KKP) supports older people living in residential facilities who are at risk from isolation. It aims to strengthen social ties and improve participants’ emotional wellbeing through participation in a weekly singing group. It also aims...

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Music, singing and wellbeing: what works? New review of evidence

Today the What Works Centre for Wellbeing launches a new systematic review of evidence from around the world into what works, and with whom, for music and singing interventions. For the first time, all available evidence has been collated and the strength of evidence has been measured. Decision-makers in charities, local authorities and funding bodies, or any organisation involved with the delivery of support services, can see which groups in society have improved wellbeing after participating in music and singing projects, or listening to music, and where the evidence gaps are. Read more and download the reports Evidence into action: singing is good news for care homes Some of the strongest evidence in the What Works review is on the benefits of group singing for older people. Here, an initiative that has successfully championed participatory singing in residential care settings for older people shares how they implemented evidence of the positive connection between singing and wellbeing in older people. “The regular inclusion of singing and live music activities in residential care homes can support positive responses to Care Quality Commission’s assessment questions,” says a new report. The report is part of an initiative entitled A Choir in Every Care Home, and is based on a year’s intensive work investigating the growing evidence for the benefits of singing. It includes the largest ever review of the published evidence about music...

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Evidence of the impact of bullying on children

To mark anti-bullying week (14-18 November) this week’s guest blog is from Claire Shenton, Senior Research Officer on Children’s Wellbeing at the Office for National Statistics (ONS), Larissa Pople, Senior Researcher at The Children’s Society, and Gwyther Rees, an Honorary Research Fellow at the Social Policy Research Unit, University of York and one of the principal investigators of the Children’s Worlds project. The Children’s Society and the University of York have been collaborating on the programme of research on children’s subjective well-being discussed in this post for over a decade. The long-term impact of bullying is something that Children’s Society and ONS monitors regularly as part of the Good Childhood Report and the Children’s Measures of National Wellbeing. The Children’s Worlds study provides an international context within which to understand the relative size and scope of the problem here compared to other areas of the world. The What Works Centre for Wellbeing are also looking at wellbeing over the life course using longitudinal data to track how wellbeing in childhood relates to outcomes in adulthood. Their findings will be published within the next year. Childhood bullying is a topic that is sometimes trivialised. But research, alongside evidence from longitudinal studies, shows that bullying needs to be taken seriously. As part of National Anti-Bullying Week (14-18 November), ONS and The Children’s Society give an overview of some of their analyses on...

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