Month: April 2016

Call for evidence: Job quality, other employment practices and wellbeing

We are  conducting a review of job quality and wellbeing. Job quality relates to the features of work often perceived to relate to satisfying or desirable work experiences – such as: some involvement in decisions about how work is to done, when it is to be done or what is to be done clarity of what is to be achieved at work the chance to use a variety of skills at work good working relationships with colleagues and/or customers attainable goals and work demands or goals that do not conflict with one and other  reasonable working hours We are specifically interested in two research questions: 1) Do improvements in job quality lead to reliable effects on worker wellbeing and productivity? 2) Are more positive outcomes achieved by introducing other changes to employment  practices alongside improved job quality? We are looking for high quality evidence on each of these questions to use as best practice examples. We are particularly seeking the following types of evidence: Evaluation studies with assessments of wellbeing made before and after the introduction of the intervention – this is to allow us to determine whether the intervention produced any changes in wellbeing. Evaluations including comparison groups that did not receive the intervention. Studies showing the combined effects of improvements in job quality and other employment practices introduced at the same time. Evidence of impacts on wellbeing that may include stress,...

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Aligning Public Policy with the Way People Want to Live – The New Zealand Treasury’s Living Standards Framework

Wellbeing is being embraced by policy makers around the world and this week we welcome colleagues from New Zealand’s Treasury to discuss their Living Standards Framework. New Zealand Treasury’s vision is to achieve higher living standards for its residents, using a much wider set of measures than just income to define wellbeing. Here, Joey Au and Girol Karacaoglu set out the Living Standards Framework:   Girol Karacaoglu, Chief Economist     Joey Au,Senior Advisor   New Zealand Treasury The ultimate purpose of public policy is to improve people’s lives, now and into the future.  We do not know how each and...

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Aligning Public Policy with the Way People Want to Live – The New Zealand Treasury’s Living Standards Framework

Wellbeing is being embraced by policy makers around the world and this week we welcome colleagues from New Zealand’s Treasury to discuss their Living Standards Framework. New Zealand Treasury’s vision is to achieve higher living standards for its residents, using a much wider set of measures than just income to define wellbeing. Here, Joey Au and Girol Karacaoglu set out the Living Standards Framework:   Girol Karacaoglu, Chief Economist     Joey Au,Senior Advisor    New Zealand Treasury The ultimate purpose of public policy is to improve people’s lives, now and into the future.  We do not know how each and...

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Have your say on Sustainable Development Goals

In the UK  the Office of National Statistics takes a snapshot of how we are doing as a nation, communities and individuals and how sustainable that is for the future in the Life in the UK reports, across the 10 domains and 41 measures of national wellbeing. At a global level the UN has the Sustainable Development Goals , or ‘Global Goals’ which are a set of 17 goals, 169 targets and 241 supporting indicators. The ONS are seeking views on what the UK report on these global goals  by 27th May. SDGs are universal – they apply to all countries and aim...

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Out of the shadows – World Bank & World Health Organisation on Mental Health

Guest blog from our Chairman Dr Paul Litchfield I have just attended a joint meeting of the World Bank and the World Health Organisation in Washington – the topic was mental health and the pressing need to make it a global development priority. It was good to see that mental illness is now, at last, being seen as part of the non-communicable disease crisis that is afflicting every part of the planet. Margaret Chan, WHO Director General, flagged up recent research showing the global cost of anxiety and depression as being $1 trillion per year and  Jim Yong Kim, World Bank President, framed the issue as one of development and not just public health. The meeting, titled Out of the Shadows, sought to shine a light on a subject still characterised in many parts of the world by fear, stigma and neglect. Even in the “developed” world the imbalance of resources devoted to mental health compared to physical health is stark. Innovative models of service delivery were showcased from around the world and ranged from individual placement and support in the most deprived communities to high tech psychological therapies. Workplace interventions are of particular interest to me but progress in that area seems remarkably slow. There appears to be a widespread reluctance by many health professionals to engage with the private sector, even in relation to companies’ own employees. Perhaps that is...

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